Get a pot of water boilin' on the stove. Tis the season to add some fiddleheads to the dinner table. It's a springtime tradition that many Mainers look forward to every year. For me and plenty of other folks around here, the little unfurled ostrich fern tops are a delectable dish we can't get enough of. Eating fiddleheads kinda reminds me of asparagus, except later on when you pee, it doesn't smell funny.

A friend of mine was just saying to me over the weekend that he had to head out to his secret spot and get to pickin'. I asked, "Could I tag along?" He was very quick to say "No."

I wasn't surprised. There are damn few folks that will reveal there fiddle headin' location, much like a the confidentiality of a favorite fishing spot.

Yup, Nana taught me when I was just a kid.  Clean off that brown husk on the tops you've brought home. Give 'em a wicked good rinse in the sink, through 'em in a pot and boil 'em for about 15 minutes and they are ready to eat. I just butter 'em up and chow down.

To some, the the idea of eating a fern sounds wicked gross. To others, they are a Maine delicacy. Pickled, fried, in a soup, whatevah.

Our friend Jeremy Grant from the Belfast area has been making wicked killah videos over the past few years. He takes us to cool places and events around the state that we otherwise might not even know about.

This one one spotlights a father and son DIY team that have been harvesting fiddleheads for a very long time together. Jeremy is also the very excited host of each fascinating episode.

You gotta love a Maine adventure video with the host landing like a superhero in the opening scene.

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Ever wondered how to pick fiddleheads like a pro? Well, meet John Gibbs and his father Daryl.

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They'll take us foraging and then after they clean 'em up, we can see how the various dishes turn out at a local restaurant.

This is bona fide Maine farm to table in action right here.

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