The New Brunswick government has modified some of its previous pandemic guidelines as the province moves to Level 2 of the Winter Plan to try to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Officials say the new measures that came into effect at midnight Tuesday are in response to the Omicron variant and the continued high number of cases in the province. New Brunswick Public Health announced 639 new coronavirus cases between Saturday and Monday. Four deaths were reported.

New public requirements now in place in New Brunswick:

  • The current household plus Steady 20 is replaced with household plus Steady 10.
  • Patrons dining at restaurants must show proof of vaccination and tables must be at least two metres apart.
  • Restaurants, retail stores, malls, businesses, gyms, salons and spas, and entertainment centres may continue to operate, but at 50 per cent capacity and with two metres of distance between patrons.
  • For public gatherings, venues cannot have events with more than 150 people or 50 per cent capacity, whichever is less.
  • Churches may operate at 50 per cent capacity and with physical distancing. Choirs are not permitted but one soloist may perform if they are at least four metres from the congregation.
  • All travellers, including New Brunswickers returning to the province, must register or have a multi-use travel pass. Travellers arriving by air will be provided with a rapid test kit.
  • Unvaccinated people entering the province must isolate and be tested on day 10. International travellers must follow federal testing and isolation guidelines and must be tested on day five and day 10.
  • Travellers must follow public health measures when in New Brunswick including wearing a mask, physically distancing and staying within a Steady 10.

More detailed information on New Brunswick's COVID-19 measures can be found here.

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