Alan Jackson was only two albums into what would become a legendary career when he was recognized with one of the most important career honors in country music. On June 7, 1991, Jackson was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry, just over a year after making his debut on the hallowed stage.

Jackson helped usher in a wave of new traditionalists in 1990 with the release of his debut album, Here in the Real World. The album spawned a string of hits including the title track, "Wanted," "Chasin' That Neon Rainbow" and "I'd Love You All Over Again." He made his Opry debut on March 3, 1990, just days after the album's release on Feb. 27. Jackson — whose previous day job had involved delivering mail to the Opry — had always dreamed of playing at the country music institution, and he performed "Here in the Real World" during his debut.

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Jackson's run of hits and genuine country approach soon made it clear he was an artist with a true commitment to traditional country values and a long career ahead. He released his second album, Don't Rock the Jukebox, on May 14, 1991, and just weeks later, Roy Acuff and Randy Travis were on hand to induct him into the Opry.

“The ultimate dream when you’re in country music is to be asked to join the Grand Ole Opry," Jackson reflects. “You think about people like Hank Williams, and Mr. Acuff, and George Jones, who stood on that spot of wood. That’s what makes you so nervous — to think about the historical part of the Opry and how it’s played such a part in country music.”

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